• We’ve linked to alleged gold-based fraud schemes before. Here’s another set of charges—for mail fraud in Oregon—against the owners of a coin business who allegedly misrepresented their operations to clients.
  • And in Alaska, a sparsely detailed indictment for money laundering growing out of a drug operation.
  • DOJ dispatched a representative to Prague to deliver remarks to the ABA’s Global White Collar Crime Institute Conference. The focus was on international cooperation in anti-bribery efforts.
  • And a few items of interest at the Supreme Court. Most significantly, longtime Deputy Solicitor General Michael Dreeben will be leaving DOJ. It’s a loss for the government to be sure: there are few more widely admired experts on federal criminal law out there.
  • In a 7–2 opinion, the Supreme Court also re-affirmed the separate sovereigns doctrine in its double-jeopardy jurisprudence that we’ve discussed before.
  • Though it’s a bit far afield from the world of corporate criminality and fraud, the Supreme Court’s fractured opinion in another criminal case featured a casual snipe by several Justices at one of the administrative law premises underlying modern governance. Too early to tell, but the case may be a harbinger of a resurrected non-delegation doctrine: Just when you thought it was defeated, it attacks again like “actual cannibal Shia LaBeouf.”