• Disgusting — Seattle man charged with selling food that was supposed to be destroyed or recycled into agricultural feed to discount grocery stores
  • The Ninth Circuit said you don’t have to know you’re transporting ammo to be convicted of smuggling ammo
  • Panasonic Avionics Corporation agreed to pay a $137.4 million penalty for falsifying its books

  • Last Monday, the U.S. Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control authorized certain transactions winding down or maintaining business with Russian aluminum giant RUSAL through October, after sanctions against the company announced earlier this month hurt industry
  • Charges against two men alleged to have been conspiring to commit economic espionage on behalf of a Chinese company

  • Lance Armstrong settled a False Claims Act case for $5 million. His cycling team was sponsored at one point by the U.S. Postal Service. Apparently doping violates the terms of federal government sponsorship agreements. Who knew?
  • In Texas, the GM of a Venezuelan energy company entered a guilty plea for his role in an international

I was thinking about double jeopardy yesterday. Not the Trebek kind, though that is my favorite tv show. Instead, I was thinking about the somewhat enigmatic statement in the Fifth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution that no person “be subject for the same offence to be twice put in jeopardy of life or limb.” My musings were prompted by yesterday’s news that New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman has asked New York’s legislature to amend the state’s double jeopardy law to ensure that state prosecutors can go after persons whose conduct violates both federal and state law but who may be pardoned by the President after being prosecuted for federal crimes. I’ll provide some context below, but I don’t want to leave you in suspense about my view: I’m troubled by this.

Continue Reading Dual Sovereignty for $1200, Alex

Did you know that, as of 2008, there’s a good chance the federal government can prosecute you for fraud against the U.S. whenever it wants to, regardless of the statute of limitations? Does that seem alarming to you?

Same here.

The government can do this because of a federal statute called the Wartime Suspension of Limitations Act. The Act says that when the U.S. is at war or “Congress has enacted a specific authorization for the use of the Armed Forces,” the statute of limitations for any offense involving fraud or attempted fraud against the U.S. or one of its agencies is suspended until five years after the termination of hostilities.


Continue Reading Frightening Facts about Fraud and the Forever War

Following our recent post on disclosures to the EPA, this week we’re going to look at disclosures to outside auditors, often in the context of internal investigations, and steps to take to limit any waiver of attorney work-product protection.  Here we go . . .

Work-product protections are not automatically waived by disclosure to

  • Don’t mess with the Postal Service — mail thieves busted in Central Oregon
  • Meanwhile, over in Eastern Washington, a grocery shop owner was allegedly engaging in food stamp fraud
  • Here in Seattle, the owner of a chain of Mexican restaurants faces tax theft charges totaling $5.6 million
  • In somewhat bigger news, the DOJ announced this