Been a while — not sure “Roundup of White Collar News” is the catchy phrase we’re looking for after a month or so, but here we go:

  • Interesting explanation of the Carter Page FISA application over at Lawfare
  • The Attorney General announced the publication of the Cyber-Digital Task Force Report — Question: does anyone actually

  • Ron Rockwell Hansen, a former Defense Intelligence Agency case officer, was arrested in Seattle for spying on behalf of China — here’s the arrest warrant and complaint
  • So many ways to commit fraud — here’s gift card fraud complete with reverse engineering, algorithms, and other techy Seattle things that lawyers don’t understand, as exemplified by

Last week, I teased the continuation of a series of posts about the Fifth Amendment.  That’s still coming, but I had to return to another common theme first.  My preview came at the end of a post about both the Fifth Amendment and parallel proceedings, which I’d also written about before. The Inception-ing of the blog continues with yet another brief comment on parallel proceedings, this time inspired by a news item that Justin flagged in last week’s roundup: Deputy Attorney General Rosenstein gave a speech before the New York City Bar Association’s annual white collar crime conference.  The whole speech is worth watching or reading, but the highlight of the address was DAG Rosenstein’s announcement of “a new Department policy that encourages coordination among Department components and other enforcement agencies when imposing multiple penalties for the same conduct.”

Continue Reading Genug with the Parallel Proceedings . . .

  • Disgusting — Seattle man charged with selling food that was supposed to be destroyed or recycled into agricultural feed to discount grocery stores
  • The Ninth Circuit said you don’t have to know you’re transporting ammo to be convicted of smuggling ammo
  • Panasonic Avionics Corporation agreed to pay a $137.4 million penalty for falsifying its books

  • Last Monday, the U.S. Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control authorized certain transactions winding down or maintaining business with Russian aluminum giant RUSAL through October, after sanctions against the company announced earlier this month hurt industry
  • Charges against two men alleged to have been conspiring to commit economic espionage on behalf of a Chinese company

  • Lance Armstrong settled a False Claims Act case for $5 million. His cycling team was sponsored at one point by the U.S. Postal Service. Apparently doping violates the terms of federal government sponsorship agreements. Who knew?
  • In Texas, the GM of a Venezuelan energy company entered a guilty plea for his role in an international