Henry Friendly still has my vote for the title of greatest American judge who ever served at any level. It’s the country’s misfortune that he never served on the U.S. Supreme Court. He did, however, spend nearly thirty years on the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit, writing more than 1,000 opinions and carving out a reputation as one of the country’s most influential jurists. On March 10, 1986, thirty-two years ago today, Friendly died.

I’ve written at some length elsewhere about my definitely-not-unhealthy devotion to a long-deceased judge on an intermediate appellate court who, with a few exceptions, did not weigh in on the most hotly contested constitutional questions of the day. But Friendly’s reputation was built on his alarming analytical acuity, the lucidity of his writing, and his record of pragmatic decisions. He also had a great eye for talent: his law clerks included Chief Justice John Roberts, federal appellate judges Merrick Garland, A. Raymond Randolph, William Bryson, Pierre Leval, and Michael Boudin, and a slew of influential lawyers and academics including Bruce Ackerman, Larry Kramer, and Ruth Wedgewood.

For purposes of this blog, Friendly wrote several decisions addressing the scope of the attorney–client privilege and reviewing convictions for white collar crimes in an era when prosecutions for such crimes were relatively rare. Two of those decisions are discussed below and recounted in detail in David Dorsen’s excellent biography of Friendly.

Continue Reading This Day in White Collar History: Remembering Henry Friendly


I imagine that word—or else a prolonged stunned silence—was the response of many attorneys and non-attorneys alike when former Trump campaign aide Sam Nunberg announced in a series of bizarre interviews today that he planned to ignore a grand jury subpoena from the Special Counsel’s office. Nunberg then dared the government to arrest him for his refusal to cooperate.

As far as strategies go, Nunberg’s is all kinds of terrible. As others have described, you can be jailed for contempt for defying a grand jury subpoena, and subpoenaed witnesses in past investigations of presidents have faced such consequences.

Mr. Nunberg did raise an interesting point in an interview with CNN’s Jake Tapper, asking whether he should have to spend “80 hours” looking for every email he had sent to other campaign advisers since November 2015, complaining that he had exchanged many emails per day with some of those people. Grand jury subpoenas to produce documents can be a pain. Below are some tips to try to reduce costs.

Continue Reading “I’ve Made a Huge Mistake,” or: Don’t Ignore Grand Jury Subpoenas and Other (Less Obvious) Tips