A lot has happened in the last few months. This is so both in the world of white-collar enforcement and just in the world. I thought I’d share some thoughts on last week’s news about Michael Flynn and the Supreme Court’s decision in the “Bridgegate” case.

I. Flynn-sanity or: Gee, it must be nice to be the President’s buddy when you lie over and over again.

First up, Michael Flynn. He’s been a repeat player on this blog.

The Background. The short version is this: After the 2016 election but before the 2017 presidential inauguration, incoming National Security Advisor Flynn spoke to Russia’s ambassador to the U.S. about U.S. sanctions against Russia. He asked the Russians not to escalate tensions. But he told incoming Vice President Pence later in the transition that he had not discussed the sanctions. He told the FBI the same thing in late January 2017. He pleaded guilty to one charge of making a false statement to the FBI, and also admitted that he had acted as an unregistered agent of the Turkish government during the transition, and that he made false statements to DOJ in March 2017 about his actions on Turkey’s behalf. But then he tried to withdraw his guilty plea. Last week, DOJ filed an unusual motion asking the court to drop the charges against Flynn.

The Controversy. Depending on who you ask, this is either (1) vindication for an innocent man railroaded by the FBI, (2) a stunning assault by the Attorney General on the rule of law and an act of pure corruption to protect the President’s allies, or (3) a small taste of the kinds of pressures that less well-connected subjects of federal investigation face every day. For my part, I lean toward some version of (2) and (3), though neither completely captures my view.
Continue Reading Some Thoughts on Michael Flynn & Bridgegate