What happens when the President of the United States asks for a bribe?

I know what you’re thinking: what could possibly have inspired this topic? I’m not here to throw partisan stones or to take sides on the House’s ongoing impeachment inquiry, though publicly available information is pretty damning. Instead, I want to look at what we know now—and what we might know in the future—through the lens of the federal criminal law governing bribery.

I want to briefly explain four things:

  1. What the bribery statute says
  2. Why the facts about Ukraine-gate potentially implicate the solicitation—but not the offering—of a bribe by the President
  3. Whether the bribery statute applies to the President
  4. What legal defenses the President may have if he’s ultimately prosecuted


Continue Reading Presidential Bribery

  • We’ve linked to alleged gold-based fraud schemes before. Here’s another set of charges—for mail fraud in Oregon—against the owners of a coin business who allegedly misrepresented their operations to clients.
  • And in Alaska, a sparsely detailed indictment for money laundering growing out of a drug operation.
  • DOJ dispatched a representative to Prague to

  • Lance Armstrong settled a False Claims Act case for $5 million. His cycling team was sponsored at one point by the U.S. Postal Service. Apparently doping violates the terms of federal government sponsorship agreements. Who knew?
  • In Texas, the GM of a Venezuelan energy company entered a guilty plea for his role in an international